Narcan Trainings at the Secaucus Library

There were 2 Free Narcan Trainings at the Secaucus Library on June 13th  & 16th. It was sponsored by the Hudson County of Health and Human Services (caresnj.org) in collaboration with the Secaucus Coalition for a Healthy and Drug Free Community.  Participants were taught how to administer the Naloxone Kit for someone who overdosed an opiod drug and were all given a kit free of charge. 

I attended the Free Narcan Training at the Secaucus Library on June 16th. There were two training dates, the other was June 13th. It was provided by the Hudson County of Health and Human Services (caresnj.org) in collaboration with The Secaucus Coalition for a Healthy and Drug Free Community.  We were taught how to administer the Naloxone Kit for someone who has overdosed from an opioid drug; in which we were all given the kit free of charge.   

Additional training included overdose prevention strategies, signs and symptoms of an overdose, rescue breathing, overdose legal rights, and support information and resources.

It is now mandatory in the town of Secaucus that all the police officers have this training. They have already had to use it here in town. One officer told me he used one on the first day he received the kit.

The training also cleared up all the false misconceptions and myths on how to deal with someone who has overdosed, often glamorized by movies and television.

This a problem that is not going away, in fact it has only gotten worse. As simple as it is to apply Naloxone, today’s opioid, in particular Heroin, is often being cut with Fentanyl which is too strong and this kit will not work.

According to the statistics that were provided, more individuals are adding fentanyl and makes up a larger percentage of what’s being ingested when the person taking the drug thinks its Heroin. However this kit is still saving many lives from a fatal overdose.

Always call 911, even if the person seems to have recovered from an overdose.

By: Rev. Craig Harris, Chairman for the Secaucus Coalition for a Healthy and Drug Free Community”